22489

DOLPHIN BALLET (SPOTTED DOLPHINS) 2187780AP

Product Details
  • In Prints: Print
  • Subject Type: Signed
Description

Spotted Dolphins (Stenella frontalis) in the waters around Bimini in the Bahamas. Dr. Denise Herzing has been studying a population of these dolphins in the Bahamas for 30 years. A large portion of her work involves working to create two way communication with the animals. She recently developed an underwater, wearable computer that can produce dolphin signature whistles and whistles that represent objects. This device can also interpret whistles from dolphins.

About National Geographic Fine Art

National Geographic | Fine Art Galleries presents fine art photography through exclusive limited editions embodying the rich heritage of the National Geographic Society and National Geographic magazine since 1888.

Trusted Retailers

National Geographic Fine Art Galleries
National Geographic Fine Art Galleries

1205 Prospect Street, Ste. A
La Jolla, California, 92037

Driving Directions | Website
STORE HOURS

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Product Specifications

DOLPHIN BALLET (SPOTTED DOLPHINS): Artist Proof

Brian Skerry

 

“The photo was taken in the Bahamas as part of a cover story for the May 2015 issue ofNational Geographic magazine. The story centered on dolphin cognition. One of those ways animals show their intelligence is through social behaviour and game play. Dolphins do this all the time. If you’re swimming behind them, they will be rubbing and nipping at each other. But it’s difficult to make a clean, single frame that has some poetry to it. It’s often cluttered or just doesn’t sing out visually the way I’d like it to. This one day, I’d swum for hours with this group of dolphins, they slowed down and allowed me to enter into their world. They began playing, doing circles, and going down to the sandy bottom, then coming back up. I hovered over them and, for this brief instant, saw how the group of dolphins was almost forming a circle. This one dolphin had broken off, swum down to the bottom and was coming back up. Typically, in underwater photography, looking downward is not the best angle for a camera. Usually, it’s looking upward toward the sun. But the white sand bottom was giving some reflection, allowing enough ambient light for me to make this frame. It was just that one brief moment. I released the shutter, and it was gone, like a ghost.”

 

ADDITIONAL INFO


LOCATION: Bimini, Bahamas

CAPTURE DATE: 2014

MEDIUM: Chromogenic Print

EDITION: 10

Have a quick question or comment?

Receive Updates from Trusted